As we begin to emerge from the pandemic and begin to see the impact and implications of Brexit, it is clear that many local public services will struggle to continue to meet the needs of their communities. The ‘New Normal’ is seeing an increasing priority for local and hyper local regeneration, inclusive growth, sustainability, and renewal to build and maintain vibrant communities.  But is the required knowledge, skills and tools to “Build Back Better” at scale and in a way that addresses not only the immediate demand and priorities, but paves the way to a better and more sustainable future?

There is no doubt that the demands and constraints that local public services are facing have never been more acute. Those who are able to access and make use of the available best practice to help with their decisions on the best way forward to recovery will undoubtedly do better and be at less risk than those who cannot. On the 8th of September the iESE Conference will celebrate the herculean efforts of the pandemic response, but also share the future best practise for the sector.  Focussing on two areas ‘Regeneration’ and ‘Digital and Technology in Social Care’, we aim to share the latest on what our communities and our councils might look like and the how we address the issues necessary to deliver a vibrant future.

Throughout the day we will be looking at examples of what local authorities are doing in relation to physical, economic, social and digital regeneration. We will explore examples of best practice, how these relate to what will be required in future and begin to look at how this can be pulled together into a set of design principles, which can be used to help guide authorities towards their best possible futures.

With constant pressures, a reduction in funding and increases in demand for social care services, delivering outcomes for vulnerable residents and preventing future demand is more challenging than ever before. Whilst there is fertile ground for digital social care transformation, scaling up our successes is always a challenge. This is where sharing leading-edge innovation makes so much sense. At our conference we will look at the technologies and approaches that forward-thinking councils are using and their supportive technologies to build dynamic social care services and what the future folds for digital and technology in social care.

To join us in-person (limited places available) or online, please register your place at www.iese.org.uk/conference-2021 .

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